Large Animal Rescue Pictures

Last week I wrote how much I enjoyed herding sheep. Seriously, I want to be a border collie in my next life. A border collie who gets to herd sheep because it was so much fun!

Anyways, I felt a little guilty for telling my dear readers to friend me on Facebook rather than upload the pictures. I thought I’d get off my lazy duff and do so today.

All the animals in these pictures are up for adoption at the MSPCA-Nevins. If you can, please welcome these wonderful animals onto your farm to give them a good life.

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The sheep I herded.

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A goose boy named Sue.

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A lovely and friendly male goat.

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Goat antics.

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An uber friendly and totally gorgeous rooster.

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Bull.

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Me leading a horse. I’d done this many times in the past but wanted a review. I totally want to start riding horses again (I did as a kid) but don’t have the money for lessons. Someday.

Now I’m going to show you the pictures of the mock drill we did on how to rescue a horse. Keep in mind this is not a real horse, it’s plastic thus no animal was harmed. The fake horse weighed about 600 pounds which is only half the weight of a normal horse so I’m told. The thing was *heavy*!

We went over four scenarios. The first was a horse down in a field. The second was a horse down in a trailer/stall. The third was a fallen horse in the woods. The fourth was how to pick up a downed horse in a field. All these scenarios can easily occur to horses, cows, and other large animals.

I’m not going upload all 204 pictures I took (seriously) nor of all the scenarios we did.

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Getting acquainted with the plastic horse and slide board.*

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Dragging a downed horse out of a trailer.

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Secured legs. This is done to a horse who is injured/ill. Before this step a vet must sedate the horse. This allows the horse to relax and to resist the urge to kick out and hurt/kill a rescuer. The horse’s face is also covered and ear plugs are put in.

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Here the horse is being pulled up at a 45* angle to facilitate the placement of the slide board.

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Strapping the horse down to the slide board. Note the white ropes are now behind this camera. The person who holds the white rope, which is connected to the carabeeners (sp?) which hold the legs together, controls the legs.

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Pulling the horse into the ambulance. Yes, the ambulance is a trailer. What else would it be?

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Horse in the wood with a broken shoulder (on top front leg)

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Dragging the horse on the slide board down the hill. The slide board is tied at two spots uphill to control the descent.

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Picking up a downed horse in a field. This is used to get a horse (or cow) standing. My understanding is when a horse (or cow) goes down and can’t get back up it’s not good. The key is getting the horse (or cow) to stand again as the first step toward healing. You wouldn’t transport your horse (or cow) this way, rather this is just to get the horse (or cow) up.

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Being pulled up.

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Standing.

The man who designed the Equine Ambulance Program at Nevins is happy to travel around the world to teach this class. He’ll also travel throughout New England to transport horses and cattle to the vet. A vet must be on scene already and must call the Equine Ambulance. A layperson such as myself cannot.

*It’s not actually called a slide board. I call it that because it’s remarkably similar to the slide boards we use at the hospital.

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5 Responses to Large Animal Rescue Pictures

  1. Allie says:

    Wow! The horse rescue training is amazing!

  2. Howling Hill says:

    Allie: you have no idea how cool it was. The instructur is willing to travel so you should set a class up in your area!

  3. lizzylanefarm says:

    Wow, what great information. Wish I had plans for ANY of the rescue animals…but I don’t. The horse is just beautiful, well they all are really.

    The rescue class sounds like it’s alot of fun and full of useful information. Who knew there were slide boards for horses…

    Your knitting project turned out just fine, and will make a treasured gift. Boo-boos or not no one will notice. I love the color.

    Enjoy the warm week coming up

    Karyn

  4. Howling Hill says:

    Karyn: I can help you set up a disaster plan for your animals if you’d like.

    Thanks for the warm compliments on the blanket. I’m not overly concerned with the mistakes. I’m not perfect so why should anything I make be?

  5. lizzylanefarm says:

    I would love it if you took a look at our disaster plan. I’m very sure you will find problems that would need to be corrected for all to go well should I ever need to use it.

    The more I look at that blanket the more I think it’s just the right color red to match a chair my husband had upholstered for me for spring. Do you remember the brand and color of the yarn?

    The fire warnings the past week or so are on my mind. Our town has on their sign no open outside fires. On the way home last nigh I saw an outside burn pile smoking away. When I let the fire dept know about it they told me not to worry, that person was on the fire dept. My, my. my how it matters who you are in this town.

    K

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